Charles Hawtrey 1914-1988: The Man Who Was Private Widdle

Charles Hawtrey 1914-1988: The Man Who Was Private Widdle

Charles Hawtrey 1914-1988: The Man Who Was Private Widdle ❰EPUB❯ ✻ Charles Hawtrey 1914-1988: The Man Who Was Private Widdle Author Roger Lewis – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk This is a small masterpiece of biographical investigation, and fitting testament to a comic genius whose place in British cultural history is now assured Charles Hawtrey, the skinny one with the grann This is a small masterpiece 1914-1988: The PDF/EPUB ½ of biographical investigation, and fitting testament to a comic genius whose place in British cultural history is now assured Charles Hawtrey, the skinny one with the granny glasses, was everybody s favourite in the Carry Ons but who exactly was he Up to now the man has remained a mysteryExamining Hawtrey s origins as a child star and performer Charles Hawtrey Kindle - in revue and the Will Hay films, this wonderful little book looks at his career in radio and television, and then to the sad and slow decline of a belligerent recluse on the Kent coast The high camp exuberance of his acting gave way to bitterness and alcoholism and if you asked Hawtrey for an autograph he d be likely to call the police insteadRoger Hawtrey 1914-1988: The PDF º Lewis s short life of Hawtrey opens out like a Chinese box to address such issues as the nature of fame, neglect, loss, sexual confusion, Drambuie, betrayal, marine bandsmen, and fine cambric knickers trimmed with lace and blue ribbon Its moral would seem to be that you don t necessarily turn out as the person you thought you d become.


10 thoughts on “Charles Hawtrey 1914-1988: The Man Who Was Private Widdle

  1. Paul Bryant Paul Bryant says:

    Sometimes we fish in murky waters Here s a tiny fragment of a book about the weird and not wonderful Charles Hawtry, a hideous caricature of an actor remembered only for being one of the abased grotesques in the grim, revolting, bargain basement, so bad it s just bad, not good bad Carry On series, famous world wide To call the Carry Ons puerile would give a bad name to puers I sometimes imagine a bunch of intellectuals in, say, Bombay, watching Carry On Up the Khyber and saying to each other Sometimes we fish in murky waters Here s a tiny fragment of a book about the weird and not wonderful Charles Hawtry, a hideous caricature of an actor remembered only for being one of the abased grotesques in the grim, revolting, bargain basement, so bad it s just bad, not good bad Carry On series, famous world wide To call the Carry Ons puerile would give a bad name to puers I sometimes imagine a bunch of intellectuals in, say, Bombay, watching Carry On Up the Khyber and saying to each other gor blimey o reilly these were our colonial masters In the painful Carry On crew Charles Hawtrey was the perpetual schoolboy with the big glasses who would dress up as a woman quicker than you could say in this scene you have to dress up as a woman He was the very definition of what most men thought homosexuals were, even camper than Kenneth Williams, and that s saying a lot Here s Roger Lewis s wonderful description of Kenneth Williams an appalling actor, affected, caustic, shrieking like a peacock and with no sense of dramatic rhythm Sinuous, snaky, serpentine, his voice and body coil and writhe across the screen, his forked tongue flickering, his nostrils looming and threatening to engulf you like railway tunnelsYes, don t get on the wrong side of Roger Lewis But he likes Hawtry Here he is liking him he s a manifestation Everything about him his bony witch s fingers, his round spectacles, his skin which was like tracing paper, his coal black lock of hair was picturesque it s the stylization of a silent movie He s like a drawing by Beardsley or Cocteau, a sketch in pen and ink, a few contours and curlicues, held together by nervous tension in his work there is enjoyment, a winningness in his life furtiveness, pride, cynicism, boredom and hatred, a strain of discord forever creaking and snapping beneath the surfaceWhy write a book, even such an afterthought of a book as this one, which isof a long pamphlet, about such a benighted creature But that s the beauty of it we re human, and are therefore part Laurence Olivier and part Charles Hawtry, part Meryl Streep and part Paris Hilton, we dream among the stars and we smirk behind our hands I think Shakespeare says something similar somewhere And we can write about what we like And sometimes we like very odd things Charles Hawtry s life is not pleasant to contemplate he wanted big ruff tuff masculine boyfriends but never got any unless money changed hands He propositioned every taxi driver who took him home when he d been slung out of a pub for propositioning every other man He had no friends, he had a Psycho style relationship with his mummy talking to her aloud after she died It seems he was never happier than when he was wearing female clothing This is just the kind of screwed up individual they had in mind when they tried and still in some places try to de program gay people You want your kid to be like Charles Hawtry Huh Well, no I really don t The cross dressing gender bending aspect of gay culture has always given me the willies oo ah ducky Firstly because it permeates British culture, particularly comedy, and is enshrined in the dame in the panto we all troop off to see every Christmas note girls dressed as boys is a whole other thing, I never mind that There s hardly a British comic who hasn t been a cock in a frock at some point in their career And second because it gives me the pernicious idea that gay men are actually all just simply transgendered, they re females born into the wrong body, that s why they want to wear mascara and camp about And same goes for the masculine lesbians too But I actually don t believe that, I think that s completely wrong headed way to think about the whole thing As I say, these are murky waters in which to fish.One thing I learned in this book was that male homosexuals often had female travelling companions which they described as a beard As in Are you taking a beard This was then gay slang Beard false beard, as in acting a part The female was acting the part of the gay man s wife.I admit to being embarrassed that this review is as long as some reviews of The Brothers Karamazov


  2. Nigeyb Nigeyb says:

    This is a very short, affectionate and touching appreciation of Charles Hawtrey who, whilst best known for his roles in the British Carry On films of the 1960s and 1970s, made his first stage appearance in 1925 at the age of 11 and continued to have a career of sorts through to the 1980s In 1972, after he was dropped by the Carry On producers, he slipped into the relative obscurity of pantomime and provincial summer seasons, whilst his alcoholism had steadily increased from the mid 1960s until This is a very short, affectionate and touching appreciation of Charles Hawtrey who, whilst best known for his roles in the British Carry On films of the 1960s and 1970s, made his first stage appearance in 1925 at the age of 11 and continued to have a career of sorts through to the 1980s In 1972, after he was dropped by the Carry On producers, he slipped into the relative obscurity of pantomime and provincial summer seasons, whilst his alcoholism had steadily increased from the mid 1960s until his death in 1988.As Roger Lewis acknowledges, as much as we love the Carry Ons and I do our affection isn t based on their artistic merits Part of the pleasure of this 98 page monograph is reading Roger Lewis s obvious love for Hawtrey s abilities and comedic skills the positive joy of Hawtrey s performances imply the possibility of happiness , coupled with his forthright opinions on some of the other Carry On regulars His fiercest criticism is reserved for the two Kenneths Kenneth Connor what a pain in the arse and Kenneth Williams an appalling actor, affected, caustic, shrieking like a peacock and with no sense of dramatic rhythm.Ultimately though, this is the tragic tale of a very lonely man Poor old Charles Hawtrey, he had a craving for the things that wouldn t come superstardom, wealth, the love of naked sailors and so developed a drinking habit, to put it mildly This may well be the perfect little book to sum up one of the sadder stories of British showbusiness, albeit one about a natural comedian who, like a select few e.g Eric Morecambe and Tommy Cooper , was funny even whilst doing very little.4 5


  3. Sean Peters Sean Peters says:

    What can you say about this book, not much really.No wonder the book is so short, there is not much in itAs a film buff, I had read all the stories of Charles Hawtrey, while making the Carry On films and also his very eccentric nasty character he become in later yearsSo this book did not explain anything new, or try to.It jumps backwards and forwards, one minute talking about the 1940 s with his roles in Will Hay films, then straight back to the 60 s and Carry on films, then to the 70 s, t What can you say about this book, not much really.No wonder the book is so short, there is not much in itAs a film buff, I had read all the stories of Charles Hawtrey, while making the Carry On films and also his very eccentric nasty character he become in later yearsSo this book did not explain anything new, or try to.It jumps backwards and forwards, one minute talking about the 1940 s with his roles in Will Hay films, then straight back to the 60 s and Carry on films, then to the 70 s, then back again.Yes I understand a quick short book about him but no real life story through the years.So sadly not muchI can say except it confirmed was a nasty character he was, nothing like the characters he played in the films.No wonder so few people went to his funeral He thought he wasimportant than he was, thought he should have top casting in the Carry On films, was really a bitter, nasty character in later years, spending time in gay clubs, living a very lonely life in Kent.Anyone came near his home, at your risk.Unless you were a big fireman


  4. Tosh Tosh says:

    A strange book about a strange man Small in pages, but it got my interest when I saw the book in a Soho London porn slash discounted bookstore Charles Hawtrey was one of the stars in the everlasting film series Carry On He was something of a misfit, quite eccentric, gay, and a horrible drunk He went out of his way to alienate fans and friends and was sort of a cheap man on top of that Was he talented or good I don t know But what s interesting is the Carry On films convey a certain as A strange book about a strange man Small in pages, but it got my interest when I saw the book in a Soho London porn slash discounted bookstore Charles Hawtrey was one of the stars in the everlasting film series Carry On He was something of a misfit, quite eccentric, gay, and a horrible drunk He went out of his way to alienate fans and friends and was sort of a cheap man on top of that Was he talented or good I don t know But what s interesting is the Carry On films convey a certain aspect of British pop culture that is low brow but also convey a certain identity to British fans The films never really made it outside of the U.K., yet I feel that it maybe important work if not artistically, then as works produced in the British post war years and what it meant to its audience Will read Kenneth Williams next


  5. Barton Young Barton Young says:

    If you can t be bothered to wriet a proper biography of Charles Hawtrey, don t bother writing one at all A few rustles in the archive and a brief spurt of writing till you got bored isn t enough, and displays the egocentricity that also fucked up Lewis Sellers book Anything about CH is interesting but please, go to Wes Butters Whatshisname The Life and Death of Charles Hawtrey instead He isn t primarily a writer, but he does a much better job of biography than Lewis gives Hawtrey.


  6. Dames Fogarty Dames Fogarty says:

    This is unreadable The author keeps getting in the way of the subject Do not read there is a paucity of material on Hawtrey but this adds nothing.


  7. Alison Sutherland Alison Sutherland says:

    A strange little book about a strange little man.


  8. Trevor Trevor says:

    An interesting insight into a sad life


  9. Angie Rhodes Angie Rhodes says:

    What a sad little book this is, we have all laughed at Charles, in the Carry On Films when he says why hello with pot lid on his head,, and as Private Widdle, even now that a lone can have fans giggling, but alas this was not the real Charlie It s a thin book, with just over a hundred pages, we don t learn much, what we do learn is that he was lonely, liked to drink and had a vicious tongue when he wanted


  10. Tony Tony says:

    This will be a short review for a short book I found this a brilliant read The perfect length for its subject and to say what Roger Lewis wanted to say about him as a person and as a kind of archetype It also sowed little seeds for further reading Definitely worth a read.I came to it as a result of a Backlisted Podcast on David Seabrook s All The Devils Are Here , which I ve also just finished and which also features tales of Charles Hawtrey in Deal Butof that anon.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *