The Friar and the Cipher: Roger Bacon and the Unsolved

The Friar and the Cipher: Roger Bacon and the Unsolved


    Download PDF books recipe for the elixir of life to good old fashioned gibberishAs we journey across centuries, languages, and countries, we meet Friar and the MOBI ☆ a cast of impassioned characters and case crackers, including, of course, Bacon, whose own personal scientific contributions, Voynich author or not, were literally and figuratively astronomical."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 320 pages
  • The Friar and the Cipher: Roger Bacon and the Unsolved Mystery of the Most Unusual Manuscript in the World
  • Lawrence Goldstone
  • English
  • 05 September 2018
  • 0767914732

10 thoughts on “The Friar and the Cipher: Roger Bacon and the Unsolved Mystery of the Most Unusual Manuscript in the World

  1. Peggy Peggy says:

    This book was kind of weird, because I was all excited to read about the mysterious Voynich manuscript, but that only took up like 3 chapters at the end The vast majority of the book was a brief history of Roger Bacon and the development of scientific thought in Europe Which was kind of interesting, but not really what I was here for Plus I noticed at least one glaring to me historical inaccuracy, where the authors seemed to say that Mary Queen of Scots claim to the English throne came t This book was kind of weird, because I was all excited to read about the mysterious Voynich manuscript, but that only took up like 3 chapters at the end The vast majority of the book was a brief history of Roger Bacon and the development of scientific thought in Europe Which was kind of interesting, but not really what I was here for Plus I noticed at least one glaring to me historical inaccuracy, where the authors seemed to say that Mary Queen of Scots claim to the English throne came through Henry VIII s older brother Arthur which is obviously false, her claim is through one of Henry s sisters It concerned me that they got so basic a fact wrong basic because Arthur having legitimate children changes everything that happened in English history Maybe I misunderstood what they were saying, because that seems like something someone should ve caught It just made me question how accurate the rest of the book was.I also really, really enjoyed those last few chapters that were actually about the manuscript and cryptography I guess this just wasn t the book I was looking for on this subject


  2. Lydia Lydia says:

    I m about 3 4 of the way through this book so far and even though I haven t finished it, I feel like I can weigh in a bit about it The basic premise of this book is that Roger Bacon created the Voynich manuscript The evidence for this is so thin and so unconvincing, though, that the author has spent the first 3 4 of the book summarizing all of Bacon s works, all of Thomas Aquinas works, and John Dee s life and obsession with Roger Bacon rather than actually talk about Bacon s involvement with I m about 3 4 of the way through this book so far and even though I haven t finished it, I feel like I can weigh in a bit about it The basic premise of this book is that Roger Bacon created the Voynich manuscript The evidence for this is so thin and so unconvincing, though, that the author has spent the first 3 4 of the book summarizing all of Bacon s works, all of Thomas Aquinas works, and John Dee s life and obsession with Roger Bacon rather than actually talk about Bacon s involvement with the Voynich manuscript.The book is also riddled with factual errors at one point the author suggests that Henry VII was Henry VIII s older brother.The idea that Bacon created the Voynich manuscript is an interesting one, but this book is so far completely underwhelming and not sufficiently scholarly.Update, now that I m finished This book is a very sketchy summary of the lives of Roger Bacon, Thomas Aquinas, John Dee, and the men and women in the 20th century who attempted to break the VMS code It s very basic and doesn t offer any new perspectives on the creation of the VMS and is in all ways completely underwhelming and disappointing


  3. Arden Arden says:

    A little while ago I heard about the Voynich manuscript, a medieval document in a language no one has ever been able to translate I wanted to learnabout this manuscript so I got this book.This book was a disappointment It isn t really about the Voynich manuscript at all, and instead spends 200 pages talking about the relationship between Aristotle s philosophy and Christianity, as well as as the history of education in Europe This book is confusing and has no sense of organization, and A little while ago I heard about the Voynich manuscript, a medieval document in a language no one has ever been able to translate I wanted to learnabout this manuscript so I got this book.This book was a disappointment It isn t really about the Voynich manuscript at all, and instead spends 200 pages talking about the relationship between Aristotle s philosophy and Christianity, as well as as the history of education in Europe This book is confusing and has no sense of organization, and I would say that this wikipedia article isinformative than this book


  4. Julie Christine Julie Christine says:

    A mosh pit of Aristotelian, medieval and Elizabethan history that had very little to do with the discovered manuscript and its translation It was very readable, written in an almost folksy style, and made me want to learnabout Roger Bacon But, the contents were so all over the historical map, it was hard to find a point of focus The individual parts were fascinating but the sum was tedious.


  5. Ken Ken says:

    Very interesting review of the Church vs Academics in the 12th century.


  6. Blyden Blyden says:

    A decent read, not as good as Out of the Flames To judge by the title I would think there would beof a focus on Roger Bacon and on the Cipher but this isof a history of the tension between religion and science from somewhat before Roger Bacon s time to a few centuries later, the time of Francis Bacon, covering a number of historical figures In a way these are backstory and context for the Roger Bacon story, and also a route through time for the provenance of the Cipher , but f A decent read, not as good as Out of the Flames To judge by the title I would think there would beof a focus on Roger Bacon and on the Cipher but this isof a history of the tension between religion and science from somewhat before Roger Bacon s time to a few centuries later, the time of Francis Bacon, covering a number of historical figures In a way these are backstory and context for the Roger Bacon story, and also a route through time for the provenance of the Cipher , but for my taste these backstory elements were relatively greater and the main story relatively sparser than I might have liked I feel the cipher was used almost as a McGuffin for the narrative We do get some core content about it, but it exists mainly as a device to weave the pieces together The material on Roger Bacon s life was very interesting to me


  7. Ted Ted says:

    I am admittedly a fan of Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone, and really liked this book What could be an interminably dry subject in the hands of other authors is kept enjoyable and readable However, the title is very misleading A substantial portion of the book is devoted to the history of the relationship of the early Christian church with science, reasoning and discovery This provides interesting background and context for the place Roger Bacon not to be confused with Francis Bacon occupied i I am admittedly a fan of Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone, and really liked this book What could be an interminably dry subject in the hands of other authors is kept enjoyable and readable However, the title is very misleading A substantial portion of the book is devoted to the history of the relationship of the early Christian church with science, reasoning and discovery This provides interesting background and context for the place Roger Bacon not to be confused with Francis Bacon occupied in history But much of the book deals with topics that are not directly related to Bacon, and certainly not related to the titular cipher, the Voynich Manuscript Probably only one fifth of the book, if that, discusses the manuscript and the endeavors to decode it So while I personally enjoyed the book, and rate it highly, I do so with the disclaimer that this book is not what a reader might think it is based solely on the title


  8. Mike Pollack Mike Pollack says:

    I am torn on how to rate this, on one hand it provided an interesting array of historical events of the 13th 16th century but on the other hand it wasn t until about page 223 of 297 that the manuscript is discussed which one would assume is the focus of the book The discussion of the book itself was interesting and I think a better approach would have been to simply focus on Bacon and then dig deeper into crypto analysis and the lives of some who sought to crack it Interesting that pages can b I am torn on how to rate this, on one hand it provided an interesting array of historical events of the 13th 16th century but on the other hand it wasn t until about page 223 of 297 that the manuscript is discussed which one would assume is the focus of the book The discussion of the book itself was interesting and I think a better approach would have been to simply focus on Bacon and then dig deeper into crypto analysis and the lives of some who sought to crack it Interesting that pages can be spent talking about 13 14th century figures that seem to be totally unrelated yet the authors only mention in passing those recent crypto analysts involved like the Friedmans, Manly and Newbold and their methods


  9. John Royal John Royal says:

    Goldstone achieved a readability score far in advance of most semi scholarly works The narrative is engrossing and informative and the scholarship is serious Good read, good mystery, farinteresting that the title might seem.


  10. Peter Stockinger Peter Stockinger says:

    If you subscribe to the authors opinion that History is full of droll characters who exist on the periphery of great events, but even in this category John Dee stands out this book might be for you I wasn t impressed


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The Friar and the Cipher: Roger Bacon and the Unsolved Mystery of the Most Unusual Manuscript in the World[Read] ➵ The Friar and the Cipher: Roger Bacon and the Unsolved Mystery of the Most Unusual Manuscript in the World Author Lawrence Goldstone – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk The Voynich Manuscript, a mysterious tome discovered in by the English book dealer Wilfrid Michael Voynich, has puzzled scholars for a century A small six inches by nine inches, but over two hundred The Voynich Manuscript, a and the MOBI õ mysterious tome discovered inby the English book dealer Wilfrid Michael Voynich, has puzzled scholars for a century A small six inches by nine inches, but over two hundred pages long, with odd illustrations of plants, astrological diagrams, and naked women, it is written in so indecipherable a language and contains so complicated a code that mathematicians, book collectors, linguists, and historians alike have yet to solve the mysteries contained withinHowever, in The Friar and the Cipher, the acclaimed bibliophiles and historians Lawrence and The Friar MOBI :å Nancy Goldstone describe, in fascinating detail, the theory that Roger Bacon, the noted thirteenth century, pre Copernican astronomer, was its author and that the perplexing alphabet was written in his hand Along the way, they explain the many proposed solutions that scholars have put forth and the myriad attempts at labeling the manuscript s content, from Latin or Greek shorthand to Arabic numerals to ancient Ukrainian to a recipe for the elixir of life to good old fashioned gibberishAs we journey across centuries, languages, and countries, we meet Friar and the MOBI ☆ a cast of impassioned characters and case crackers, including, of course, Bacon, whose own personal scientific contributions, Voynich author or not, were literally and figuratively astronomical.


About the Author: Lawrence Goldstone

Lawrence Goldstone is the and the MOBI õ author of fourteen books of both fiction and non fiction Six of those books were co authored with his wife, Nancy, but they now write separately to save what is left of their dishesGoldstone s articles, reviews, and opinion pieces have appeared in, among other publications, the Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Miami Herald, Hartford Courant, and Berkshire Eagle He has also written for a number of magazines that have gone bust, although he denies any cause and effectHis first novel, The Friar MOBI :å Rights, won a New American Writing Award but he now cringes at its awkward prose Anatomy of Deception and The Astronomer are much better Despite a seemingly incurable tendency to say what s on his mind thus mortifying Nancy , Goldstone has been widely interviewed on both radio and television, with appearances on, among others, Fresh Air NPR , To the Best of Our Knowledge NPR , The Faith Middleton Show NPR , Tavis Smiley PBS , and Leonard Lopate WNYC His work has also been profiled in Friar and the MOBI ☆ The New York Times, The Toronto Star, numerous regional newspapers, Salon, and SlateGoldstone holds a PhD in American Constitutional Studies from the New School His friends thus call him DrG, although he can barely touch the rim Sigh Can t make a layup any either He and his beloved bride founded and ran an innovative series of parent child book groups, which they documented in Deconstructing Penguins He has also been a teacher, lecturer, senior member of a Wall Street trading firm, taxi driver, actor, quiz show contestant, and policy analyst at the Hudson InstituteHe is a unerring stock picker Everything he buys instantly goes down.