What Makes Me a Quaker? MOBI Ò Makes Me a PDF/EPUB

What Makes Me a Quaker? MOBI Ò Makes Me a PDF/EPUB

What Makes Me a Quaker? ❴BOOKS❵ ⚣ What Makes Me a Quaker? Author Adam Woog – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk The Religious Society of Friends the Quakers formed in the mid s Known for their democratic organization and near silent services, Quakers were prominent in settling early America Despite their relati The Religious Me a Kindle Ð Society of Friends the Quakers formed in the mid s Known for their democratic organization and near silent services, Quakers were What Makes Kindle - prominent in settling early America Despite their relatively small numbers, the Quakers have since made disproportionately large contributions to the causes of social justice, Makes Me a PDF/EPUB ã peace, and reform.


About the Author: Adam Woog

Adam Woog, Me a Kindle Ð a native Seattleite and lifelong visitor to the locks, has written dozens of books for children, young adults, and adults He What Makes Kindle - has a special interest in biography and history, and several of his books focus on Pacific Northwest topics.



10 thoughts on “What Makes Me a Quaker?

  1. Thomas Andrikus Thomas Andrikus says:

    Quakerism began with the teachings of George Fox, an Englishman He was dissatisfied in denominations that have become complicated and impersonal, far removed from Jesus s lessons of simplicity and modesty After receiving spiritual visions that revealed to him that a part of God s spirit lives in every person, he started preaching his message Thus, the Religious Society of Friends which is the official name of Quakers began.Some of the basic aspects of Quakerism discussed in this book are 1 Quakerism began with the teachings of George Fox, an Englishman He was dissatisfied in denominations that have become complicated and impersonal, far removed from Jesus s lessons of simplicity and modesty After receiving spiritual visions that revealed to him that a part of God s spirit lives in every person, he started preaching his message Thus, the Religious Society of Friends which is the official name of Quakers began.Some of the basic aspects of Quakerism discussed in this book are 1 found in England in 17th century, but popularized in USA.2 Quakerism encourages its followers to be plain as Jesus was, such as in their clothings and church buildings.3 Though they believe that the Bible is a sacred and holy text, Quakers aka the Friends generally believe that God s spirit isimportant Hence, they always try their best to act out their compassion for people of all backgrounds.4 Quakers view that all humans were equal helped them to became one of the pioneer groups who helped shaping the U.S constitution and Bill of Rights, and fought for abolition of slavery.5 The Quakers reputation for pacifism made most though not all Quakers stay away from military, even during war draft.6 Kenya has the highest number of Quakers today,than even USA.7 Quakers emphasis on education is proven by the fact that they founded Cornell and Johns Hopkins.8 The building for group worship in Quakerism can be called churches, though most Quakers prefer to call them meeting houses Their Sunday service are simply called worship or meeting Keeping in line with their spirit of living plainly, their church buildings have little or no distinctive ornaments or decorations not even crosses like most other denominations These worship services are open to non Quakers who want to join them.9 Quakers Sunday meetings has no elaborate ceremonies or rituals like in other churches Even their weddings consist merely of simple vows between husband and wife.10 Despite their small numbers, they have had huge impact on society due to their struggles to ensure human rights Throughout history, the Quakers have lived up to what George Washington said about them, There is no denomination among us who areexemplary and useful citizens


  2. Ann Ann says:

    Just enough information for me for now I often explore ideas and things that are new to me by borrowing a J book from the library Easy, quick reading and then I can decide whether to pursue the topic I was pleased to see this book did not gloss over or ignore some issues of religious practices.


  3. Kari Schooley Kari Schooley says:

    Good information for anyone wanting to knowabout The Society of Friends.


  4. Jobiska (Cindy) Jobiska (Cindy) says:

    This is a pretty good introduction to Quakerism for middle readers I found the scattered bolded words e.g persecuted, doctrines followed by parenthetical definitions very distracting, particularly since there was a glossary in the back which also covered these words I also wish that the paintings were credited with title artist, whether in the caption or as an appendix same with the photos I would have liked to know the location of all the photos, to see if it was a representative sam This is a pretty good introduction to Quakerism for middle readers I found the scattered bolded words e.g persecuted, doctrines followed by parenthetical definitions very distracting, particularly since there was a glossary in the back which also covered these words I also wish that the paintings were credited with title artist, whether in the caption or as an appendix same with the photos I would have liked to know the location of all the photos, to see if it was a representative sample but especially the paintings This does fill a need, because I don t think there is enough on Quakerism that is aimed at this age I learnedfrom fictional books such as Thee Hannah than I did from non fiction when I was that age


  5. Basil Basil says:

    Great book for introducing kids to Quaker lifestyle and beliefs, or explaining to a Quaker child what makes their religion unique Also not bad for adults if they want a simple CliffNotes explanation of what the Society of Friends is about.


  6. Nancy Nancy says:

    Good series for kids on various religions.


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