Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and

Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and



10 thoughts on “Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and Creation

  1. L.J.M. Owen L.J.M. Owen says:

    I loved this book for it s in depth exploration of the modern western history of interpreting Olmec art, deconstruction of those views, and re examination of the archaeological record to deliver a richer,complete and overallhuman interpretation of Olmec art Wish there wereacademic works like this one


  2. Kathleen Kathleen says:

    This is an important addition to the body of scholarly literature about Olmec art, especially the figurines often described as were jaguars or dwarfs Tate makes a compelling case for her theory that these figurines represent fetuses, specifically fetuses about 10 weeks old She compares medical illustrations of miscarried fetuses to the figurines to show the similarities She goes on to say that if these people had turned to maize corn as a major source of nourishment, but the maize was not t This is an important addition to the body of scholarly literature about Olmec art, especially the figurines often described as were jaguars or dwarfs Tate makes a compelling case for her theory that these figurines represent fetuses, specifically fetuses about 10 weeks old She compares medical illustrations of miscarried fetuses to the figurines to show the similarities She goes on to say that if these people had turned to maize corn as a major source of nourishment, but the maize was not treated with lime or ash, it would not have released the nutrients necessary for a developing fetus and miscarriage would have been common.Interestingly, Tate shows that when the Spanish brought corn back to Europe with them, its introduction was followed by terrible outbreaks of pellagra, especially among the poor, who were eating a lot of the inexpensive and untreated corn, which did not give them enough nutrients to survive.It s not known why the Olmec featured these fetuses in so much of their art Perhaps, like so many modern people who have suffered through the heartache of a miscarriage or stillbirth, they saw these lost children as angels spirit beings that belonged to another world.Even if you don t agree with all of Tate s points, this book is a well researched, carefully documented, and fascinating addition to a field that s been bound for too long by opinions given decades ago


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Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and Creation ➵ [Reading] ➷ Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and Creation By Carolyn E. Tate ➪ – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Recently, scholars of Olmec visual culture have identified symbols for umbilical cords, bundles, and cave wombs, as well as a significant number of women portrayed on monuments and as figurines In thi Recently, scholars of Olmec visual culture have identified Visual Culture: eBook ´ symbols for umbilical cords, bundles, and cave wombs, as well as a significant number of women portrayed on monuments and as figurines In this groundbreaking study, Carolyn Tate demonstrates that these subjects were part of a major emphasis Reconsidering Olmec Epub / on gestational imagery in Formative Period Mesoamerica In Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture, she identifies the presence of women, human embryos, and fetuses in monuments and portable objects dating fromtoBC and originating throughout much of Mesoamerica This highly original study sheds new light on the prominent roles that Olmec Visual Culture: ePUB ´ women and gestational beings played in Early Formative societies, revealing female shamanic practices, the generative concepts that motivated caching and bundling, and the expression of feminine knowledge in theday cycle and related divinatory and ritual activitiesReconsidering Olmec Visual Culture is the first study that situates the unique hollow babies of Formative Mesoamerica within the context of prominent females and the prevalent imagery of gestation and birth It is also the first major art historical study of La Venta and the first to identify Mesoamerica s earliest creation narrative It provides a nuanced understanding of how later societies, including Teotihuacan and West Mexico, as well as the Maya, either rejected certain Formative Period visual forms, rituals, social roles, and concepts or adopted and transformed them into the enduring themes of Mesoamerican symbol systems.