King Henry VI, Part 2 PDF/EPUB î Henry VI, Part Epub

King Henry VI, Part 2 PDF/EPUB î Henry VI, Part Epub



10 thoughts on “King Henry VI, Part 2

  1. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    King Henry VI, Part 2 2 Henry VI Wars of the Roses 6 , William ShakespeareHenry VI, Part 2, is a history play, by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1591, and set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of England Henry VI, Part 2, focuses on the King s inability to quell the bickering of his nobles, the death of his trusted adviser Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, the rise of the Duke of York, and the inevitability of armed conflict As such, the play culminates with the openi King Henry VI, Part 2 2 Henry VI Wars of the Roses 6 , William ShakespeareHenry VI, Part 2, is a history play, by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1591, and set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of England Henry VI, Part 2, focuses on the King s inability to quell the bickering of his nobles, the death of his trusted adviser Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, the rise of the Duke of York, and the inevitability of armed conflict As such, the play culminates with the opening battle of the War, the First Battle of St Albans 1455 The second part of Henry the sixth Second part of Henry VI , William Shakespeare , edited by William Montgomery, with an introduction by Janis Lull New York Penguin Books , 2000 1379 140p ISBN 0 14 7 1466 9 2014 1590 1592 1445 1455 1422 1471 1447 1450 1455


  2. Barry Pierce Barry Pierce says:

    There s a whole act in which some random Irish guy literally invades London, calls himself the mayor, and is then accidentally beheaded in a garden.


  3. Bill Kerwin Bill Kerwin says:

    Not quite as good as Henry VI, Part I perhaps because by its very nature it possesses no beginning and no end The first four acts, halfway between the political disputes of the uncles and the factional and dynastic struggles of the Wars of the Roses, are necessarily episodic and often seem formless Shakespeare is learning his craft here, and he often over relies on lengthy monologues and soliloquys to reveal character and motivation There are good scenes here, often involving commoners and Not quite as good as Henry VI, Part I perhaps because by its very nature it possesses no beginning and no end The first four acts, halfway between the political disputes of the uncles and the factional and dynastic struggles of the Wars of the Roses, are necessarily episodic and often seem formless Shakespeare is learning his craft here, and he often over relies on lengthy monologues and soliloquys to reveal character and motivation There are good scenes here, often involving commoners and commonsense observations Gloucester s debunking of a bogus miracle, Warwick s forensic analysis of Gloster s corpse, Jack Cade s ignorant vitality but these virtues are overshadowed by the shallow, vituperative rhetoric Then, in Act Five, the Wars between York and Lancaster begin in earnest, and with the arrival of the hunchbacked Gloster and his enemy Young Clifford the verse takes on a new subtlety and intensity This change is exciting almost as if the genius of Shakespeare had first taken charge, right here, in the last act of this old play


  4. Darwin8u Darwin8u says:

    Burn all the records of the realm My mouth shall be the Parliament of EnglandShakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act IV.7So, I liked Part 2 of Henry VI a lot better than Part 1 It still isn t Hamlet, but it is complicated, funny, twisted in parts One of my favorite aspects of the play are the scenes with Queen Margaret and Suffolk No They aren t great people, but they are a great couple Their parting is amazing and poetic My other favorite part is, well, anything with Jack Cade Sir John MBurn all the records of the realm My mouth shall be the Parliament of EnglandShakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act IV.7So, I liked Part 2 of Henry VI a lot better than Part 1 It still isn t Hamlet, but it is complicated, funny, twisted in parts One of my favorite aspects of the play are the scenes with Queen Margaret and Suffolk No They aren t great people, but they are a great couple Their parting is amazing and poetic My other favorite part is, well, anything with Jack Cade Sir John Mortimer how can you not love a guy who knights himself He is one of those great populists in literature and history, belonging on the shelf next to Huey Long and Donald Trump Dammit I m trying to avoid Trump by reading the classics and I come across Cade and the Butcher and all their anti intellectual followers Burn the accountants and kill all the lawyers We march on Washington D.C boys.There were also several nice lines, specificallyThe first thing we do, let s kill all the lawyers Let them obey that knows not how to ruleCould I come near your beauty with my nails,I could set my ten commandments in your face My shame will not be shifted with my sheet A staff is quickly found to beat a dog So he be dead for that is good conceitWhich mates him first that first intends deceit For where thou art, there is the world itself,With every several pleasure in the world And where thou art not, desolation If I depart from thee, I cannot live.And in thy sight to die, what were it elseBut like a pleasant slumber in thy lap This way fall I to death Because my book preferred me to the king,And seeing ignorance is the curse of God,Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven


  5. Leonard Gaya Leonard Gaya says:

    This one is episode 6 of Shakespeare s massive historical drama cycle on the Plantagenet Lancaster York dynasty Previously Henry VI, Part 1 , the English lords were trying to forcibly stifle the French rebellion led by a diabolical Joan of Arc, while, back in England, Gloucester and Winchester were pitched against each other and the War of the Roses was slowly brewing This Part 2 is composed of two very different sections and storylines, sewn together into one single play.The first part This one is episode 6 of Shakespeare s massive historical drama cycle on the Plantagenet Lancaster York dynasty Previously Henry VI, Part 1 , the English lords were trying to forcibly stifle the French rebellion led by a diabolical Joan of Arc, while, back in England, Gloucester and Winchester were pitched against each other and the War of the Roses was slowly brewing This Part 2 is composed of two very different sections and storylines, sewn together into one single play.The first part from the beginning until the end of act III could be titled The downfall of Gloucester recommended to all Ned Stark s fans Henry VI is as yet too young to reign, so his uncle Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, rules in his stead This situation, of course, stirs the greediness of everyone around him Winchester, Suffolk, York and the Queen Margaret of Anjou plot in every possible way to remove Gloucester, taking advantage of his weak spot his ambitious wife Eleanor who is a sort of Lady Macbeth The whole conspiracy against Gloucester gives rise to a few exciting pieces of drama For instance, York s monologue I, 1, 210 sqq heralds Richard III similar speech a couple of plays later Another of his addresses II, 2, 10 sqq is a different version of the royal family tree and can be compared with the one put forward by Mortimer in Part 1 Another still III, 1, 331 sqq is a straight out Machiavellian manifesto and, quite simply, a fantastic line The whole thing, however, culminates in act III with a series of frenzied arguments which, in many cases, are borderline bombastic.Meanwhile, the King comes across as a well meaning but bumbling bigot The eventual separation of his unfaithful Queen Margaret from the Duke of Suffolk a sort of dark Tristan Isolde affair is perhaps intended to be emotional Unfortunately, I confess that the pomposity and pathos of it all got a bit exhausting in the end.The second part acts IV and V takes a very different turn It starts with a sea battle and a band of pirates, and, soon after, Jack Cade s topsy turvy, down and out and blood spattered rebellion For the duration, Shakespeare set aside his iambic pentameter and wrote the whole thing in prose There is something surprisingly familiar and modern about the description of this popular uprising Cade is just as hysterical as the Pucelle in Part 1 Further, his political programme sounds like insane pre Marxist communism I couldn t help but think of some corybantic politicians such as Trump or Farage when I read some of Cade s lines e.g IV, 2, 61 sqq by the way, he too has a line and a claim regarding the family tree see IV, 2, 124 sqqNevertheless, it eventually goes tits up, with a nightmarish carnival of rape, looting and butchery, until the flip flopping people of London turn their back on him The play closes with the epic battle of Saint Albans the real starting point of the War of the Roses , the death of Old Clifford an echo of that of Young Talbot in the previous play , and the victory of the evil mastermind, the Duke of York In short, an energetic and brilliant play EditThe Hollow Crown The Wars of the Roses 2016 TV adaptation of Henry VI, Parts 1 and 2 is a drastically rewritten and condensed version of Shakespeare s plays Most of Talbot and all of Cade s scenes have been removed from the plot, to focus on the Gloucester drama In truth, Hugh Bonneville best known for his role in Downton Abbey offers a first class performance Sophie Okonedo, in the role of the treacherous French queen, is outstanding as well


  6. E. G. E. G. says:

    General IntroductionThe Chronology of Shakespeare s WorksIntroduction, by Michael TaylorThe Play in PerformanceFurther Reading The First Part of the Contention Betwixt the Two Famous Houses of York and Lancaster An Account of the TextGenealogical TablesCommentary


  7. Bradley Bradley says:

    This is a very uneven play, unfortunately The first half attempts, mostly unsuccessfully, to justify and ramp up the enmity between the Lancaster line in Suffolk and the rage of York It s mostly just scheming and jealousy and the blame game York wanted to have his blood tied to the King while Suffolk at least in the play, if not in actual fact, history, was smitten with Queen Margaret, whom he unwisely pushed off to his king instead of just making her his own, with huge overtones of Lancelo This is a very uneven play, unfortunately The first half attempts, mostly unsuccessfully, to justify and ramp up the enmity between the Lancaster line in Suffolk and the rage of York It s mostly just scheming and jealousy and the blame game York wanted to have his blood tied to the King while Suffolk at least in the play, if not in actual fact, history, was smitten with Queen Margaret, whom he unwisely pushed off to his king instead of just making her his own, with huge overtones of Lancelot and Gwennie.And then Suffolk dies in sweet tune to the prophesy that the play begins with, and then the action and the interest picks up, turning a frankly boring escapade into a pretty awesome end.So, yeah, I call the first half of this play weak Weak, I say The second half, the parts where Jack Cade, care of York and his scheming and his soon forthcoming full attempt upon the Throne of England, brings all the blood and pillage and a truly immense amount of book burning upon the stage, with ignorant masses calling for the downfall of whatever bogeyman they can conjure out of smoke or just the smoke from Jack Cade s arse Mind you, this is strictly historical, although he wasn t quite as villainous as portrayed here I think Cade honestly wanted a populist rebellion, but when he let slip his control of the masses and let them pillage and rape and steal after being successful against the king s mismanaged forces, he lost all the honor he might have won in the day.In the play, instead, we re treated to something quire gruesome with a number of heads on poles.After that bit wrapped up, though, it was York s turn, bringing his army into Kent after it had been softened by Cade, and after a few reversals, he manages to win and see the king flee off to London and sets himself up as another king of England.The action and the story and the cliffhanger is quite delicious, assuming you hadn t fallen asleep during the first parts of the play Alas The broad outlines of what happened in history is pretty on target, but some motivations are ramped up or made from whole cloth to make the playexciting Can I blame it Not really.Warwick doesn t really feel as important in the play as he always felt in my readings of history, either Or perhaps that s just because he really hasn t come into his own until Part 3 But as a side note, one thing I found rather delicious was the youthful and smartass future King Richard III being all valorous and quick of foot and mind amongst all his older brothers and his father Hey look, it s a the young man who ll grow up to be a wretched monster lol Well, that s Shakespeare History is full of supporters and detractors of Richard of York and where does the truth really lie I just wish this play had beeneven in quality Sigh


  8. Michael Finocchiaro Michael Finocchiaro says:

    Another rather confusing and violent episode in the unfortunate career of Henry VI, Part 2 covers the beginning of his troubled marriage as well as the true start to the War of the Roses which will claim so many lives until the end of Richard III Henry loses to York and flees the capital as the play ends I found it maybe slightlyinteresting than Part 1, but still rather confusing I like the couplet in which York declares war on Lancaster Henry VI And force perforce I ll make him yield Another rather confusing and violent episode in the unfortunate career of Henry VI, Part 2 covers the beginning of his troubled marriage as well as the true start to the War of the Roses which will claim so many lives until the end of Richard III Henry loses to York and flees the capital as the play ends I found it maybe slightlyinteresting than Part 1, but still rather confusing I like the couplet in which York declares war on Lancaster Henry VI And force perforce I ll make him yield the crownWhose bookish rule hath pulled fair England down.Henry VI, Part 2, Act 1, scene iHenry s marriage to Margarite has lost the possessions that England previously held there and for this York wants to punish him and claim the crown


  9. Trish Trish says:

    My goodness, what did I just read Will, buddy, no Just no.This second part about King Henry VI starts with him getting married to Margaret of Anjou who, by the way, was penniless but he wanted her nevertheless In Shakespeare s play, she s the lover of Suffolk not true but the rumour was spread in order to defame her since the English had a problem with a French queen Gloucester is the Lancaster s counterpart in parliament and thus to the queen, but through Suffolk Gloucester s wife is l My goodness, what did I just read Will, buddy, no Just no.This second part about King Henry VI starts with him getting married to Margaret of Anjou who, by the way, was penniless but he wanted her nevertheless In Shakespeare s play, she s the lover of Suffolk not true but the rumour was spread in order to defame her since the English had a problem with a French queen Gloucester is the Lancaster s counterpart in parliament and thus to the queen, but through Suffolk Gloucester s wife is led to witchcraft, then arrested and exiled which is a scandal for her husband diminishing his power Looong story short there is lots and LOTS of intrigue at court, eventhan in the previous part, only this time including a queen that refuses to be an adornment but gets very heavily involved in politics, culminating in Suffolk killing Gloucester through assassins, historically not accurate but so mucheffective in a play Oh and in the play, Richard of York voices his claim on the throne at this point already, at least to some who swear him loyalty also not true.Seriously, this first half or so of the play was just hurtful Then however we get pirates And for once I didn t care that much that it wasn t true because it was exciting Harhar PYork is sent to Ireland supposedly to end a revolt but actually to be out of the way , but instructs an agent, Cade, to stage a rebellion the rebellion really took place but it s highly unlikely that York had anything to do with it, he just wanted to benefit from it The parts about the rebellion were wonderfully awash with blood and terror and I enjoyed it quite a bit I mean, Shakespeare didn t have to change much here since Cade went from hero of the common folk to thieving and dishonourable betrayer all on his own which made him lose.And then, suddenly, shit really hits the fan when York returns with an army And this is where York would become unpopular with me if I didn t know the true historical facts because he declares himself another King of England in the play after causing Henry VI to flee The truth is that he never did that instead he repeatedly to the point of stupidity kept silent about his claim and swore loyalty to the weakling king, pointing out that his grievance was with the king s advisers At a certain point York promises to stop his campaign if his chief rival, Somerset, is imprisoned but he is betrayed historically inaccurate again, it was not so much a planned betrayal as a string of unlucky coincidences coupled with Henry VI s weakness again and thus declares his claim on the throne officially not true at this point in time , prompting again a who will choose which rose scene However, thank goodness, all this build up ends in a nice battle at St Albans where Somerset is finally killed he was like a cockroach, I sooo wanted him to finally die already and Margaret flees with the king and the son of the now dead Somerset it s just one damned Somerset after another, I swear This was so hard to get through and I was very much tempted to just skim and skip to the better bits I had been told they were there But I persevered and the second half actually a bit less really was much better, having taken up considerably in pace Still, just like the first part, this just couldn t convince me Maybe it really has something to do with the fact that these two parts were written so early in Shakespeare s career and he yet had to hone his skill I don t know Regarded as one work, they really are important for the overview but the execution is somewhat lacking unfortunately


  10. leynes leynes says:

    Witch burning, several beheadings and a bloody civil war buckle up, bitches, issa history play I know that I committed a cardinal sin by reading Willie s Wars of the Roses completely out of order heck, my reading order for just the three parts of Henry VI was completely messed up 1 3 2 but suck it, losers, at least I did it I read the eight damn plays, give me a break Can we outrun the heavens Overall, I have to say that Willie s history plays really grew on me over time and I al Witch burning, several beheadings and a bloody civil war buckle up, bitches, issa history play I know that I committed a cardinal sin by reading Willie s Wars of the Roses completely out of order heck, my reading order for just the three parts of Henry VI was completely messed up 1 3 2 but suck it, losers, at least I did it I read the eight damn plays, give me a break Can we outrun the heavens Overall, I have to say that Willie s history plays really grew on me over time and I also like the fact that the Wars of the Roses in particular really read like a modern historical fiction series A lot of the characters play a big role through multiple of the plays and it s fun to follow them around and see their rise and fall I grew particularly enamoured with Henry V, knowing about his struggle with his father in his youth made him a muchlikeable and relatable king when it was finally his time to shine When it comes to his son, Henry VI, however, I have to say that I just hate his guts He is so stupid and annoying and I was just rooting for that bitch to die Unfortunately for me, he is the one who got three fucking plays about his reign Like, why Anyways, Henry VI, Part 2 picks up right where Part 1 left off Henry is overjoyed as Suffolk that nasty ass hands the beautiful Margaret of Anjou to him to be his queen Gloucester and Warwick which I style the uncles are appalled at the political cost, since Anjou and Maine will now go back to France York that crazy ass reveals to take the crown for himself what a surprise What then ensued can be summed up in one word meddling Gloucester s wife Eleanor aka my bae dreams that she should be king mood and the queen conspires with her lover Suffolk to bring the Gloucesters down Eleanor confides in spirits and witches which ends badly for her when it is discovered, she is exiled and the witch is burned at the stake Gloucester resigns in shame, however, that s not enough for our crazy Queen and together with York and Cardinal they agree to have Gloucester murdered Henry, yet again, proves that he isn t fit to rule by being overwhelmed to the max, throwing a hissy fit because nobody listens to him and then proceeds to give York an army the man is trying to usurp your throne, wake up, hun and faints at the slightest notion of blood I cannot even Suffolk gets beheaded Jack Cade a random Irishman , urged on by York, orchestrates a peasant s uprising and starts invading London you can t make that shit up but the rebels are easily persuaded to lay their weapons down York, having in the background worked on the support for his claim to the throne, comes to London to tell Henry that his rule is over Even Salisbury and Warwick switch alliance to him because they finally have enough of Henry s shitty ruling Henry and Margaret flee The curtain closes Phew I m happy that I m finally done following this weak king around Henry VI is really a failure on every level What I enjoyed most in this second part were definitely the two women, Margaret and Eleanor Both of them were absolutely savages and even Lady Macbeth could never Here are some gems from their speeches and accusations all directed towards the men in their lives Eleanor about her husbandWere I a man, a duke, and next of blood, I would remove these tedious stumbling blocksAnd smooth my way upon their headless necks Margaret to her loverFie, coward woman and soft hearted wretch Hast thou not spirit to curse thine enemy I gotta love Willie for his female characters who feel like they could do so muchif only they were born men Your time will come, ladies


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King Henry VI, Part 2 ❰PDF / Epub❯ ★ King Henry VI, Part 2 Author William Shakespeare – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Henry VI of England WikipediaHenri VI roi d Angleterre Wikipdia Henri VI d Angleterredcembre mai, est roi d Angleterre de, puis de Henri VI premire partie WikipdiaHenry VI Biography Facts Britannica H Henry VI of England WikipediaHenri VI, Part eBook ✓ VI roi d Angleterre Wikipdia Henri VI d Angleterredcembre mai, est roi d Angleterre de, puis de Henri VI premire partie WikipdiaHenry VI Biography Facts Britannica Henry VI, born December Windsor, Berkshire, England died May London , king of England fromtoand fromto , a pious and studious recluse whose incapacity for government was one of the causes of the Wars of the Roses read More on This Topic United Kingdom Henry VI and BBC History King Henry VI Henry King Henry MOBI :å VI King fromtoand fromtoand the last Lancastrian ruler of England, Henry s reign was dominated by the Wars of the Roses Henry was King Henry VI BritroyalsHENRY VI, King of England Wars of HENRY VI, King of England Wars of the Roses HENRY VI, King of England, son of King Henry V and Catherine of Valois, was born at Windsor on the th of DecemberHe became King of England on the st of September , and a few weeks later, on the death of his Henry VI, Part Epub µ grandfather Charles VI, was proclaimed king of France alsoFacts About King Henry VI History Hit He was crowned King Henry VI of England at Westminster Abbey onNovembertwo years later onDecemberhe was also crowned King Henry II of France at Notre Dam in ParisHe was controlled by powerful figures The most prominent of these figures was Edmund Beaufort,nd Duke of Somerset, and Margaret of Anjou, Henry s wife Henry VI of England Simple English Wikipedia, the Henry VIDecember Maywas King of England upon the death of Henry V onAugusttoand then fromtoMayHe was also the King of France fromtoHenry VIII Wikipedia Henry VIIIJune Januarywas King of England fromuntil his death inHenry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage to Catherine of Aragon annulled.