Between Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted MOBI

Between Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted MOBI


Between Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted ❮Download❯ ➾ Between Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted Author Suleika Jaouad – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk A searing, deeply moving memoir of illness and recovery that traces one young woman’s journey from diagnosis to remission and, ultimately, a road trip of healing and selfdiscovery

In the su A searing, deeply Kingdoms: A MOBI ☆ moving memoir of illness and recovery that traces one young woman’s journey from diagnosis to remission and, ultimately, a road trip of healing and selfdiscoveryIn the summer after graduating from college, Suleika Jaouad was preparing, as they say in commencement Between Two Epub / speeches, to enter “the real world” She had fallen in love and moved to Paris to pursue her dream of becoming a war correspondent The real world she found, however, would take her into a very different kind of conflict zoneIt started with an Two Kingdoms: A PDF/EPUB å itch—first on her feet, then up her legs, like a thousand invisible mosquito bites Next came the exhaustion, and the sixhour naps that only deepened her fatigue Then a trip to the doctor and, a few weeks shy of her twentythird birthday, a diagnosis: leukemia, with apercent chance of survival Just like that, the life she had imagined for herself had gone up in flames By the time Jaouad flew home to New York, she had lost her job, her apartment, and her independence She would spend much of the next four years in a hospital bed, fighting for her life and chronicling the saga in a column for The New York TimesWhen Jaouad finally walked out of the cancer ward—after three and a half years of chemo, a clinical trial, and a bone marrow transplant—she was, according to the doctors, cured But as she would soon learn, a cure is not where the work of healing ends; it’s where it begins She had spent the past , days in desperate pursuit of one goal—to survive And now that she’d done so, she realized that she had no idea how to liveHow would she reenter the world and live again? How could she reclaim what had been lost? Jaouad embarked—with her new best friend, Oscar, a scruffy terrier mutt—on a daymile road trip across the country She set out to meet some of the strangers who had written to her during her years in the hospital: a teenage girl in Florida also recovering from cancer; a teacher in California grieving the death of her son; a deathrow inmate in Texas who’d spent his own years confined to a room What she learned on this trip is that the divide between sick and well is porous, that the vast majority of us will travel back and forth between these realms throughout our lives Between Two Kingdoms is a profound chronicle of survivorship and a fierce, tender, and inspiring exploration of what it means to begin again.


10 thoughts on “Between Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted

  1. Carolann Carolann says:

    This book is sort of divided into three parts. When the book opens, Suleika Jaouad has just graduated from college. She moved to Paris and fell in love. Then, she found out she had leukemia. She moved back home with her parents in New York to begin treatment. Her boyfriend, who she really has only begun dating, leaves Paris and also moves in with her parents to support her.

    This part of the book was incredibly difficult to read at times, because she went through so much. During her treatment, she could not take care of herself at all, and constantly needed someone with her. Her boyfriend and mom ended up taking shifts because she could not be alone. On one heartbreaking occasion, she is alone for the evening and doesn’t even have the energy to get food to take with her mediation. Her boyfriend comes to home to find her on the floor throwing up.

    She had a very small chance to survive and had to watch her parents practically grieve her. Along the way, she makes friends who are also battling cancer and together they form their “cancer crew.” I could not hold back my tears as she describes their friendship, their hard conversations, and the way she had to say goodbye to them one by one.

    At a young age, Jaouad experienced more than most of us will experience in a lifetime. She found herself wanting to write, to get her story out, to have her life and her story mean something. Despite having absolutely no energy, she forms a blog, which quickly turns into a column for the New York Times. People begin to write to Jaouad from all over the world to express their support, to share their stories.

    After she recovers, she has a hard time finding her way “between two kingdoms,” that is, between the kingdom of the sick and the kingdom of the healthy. After not being able to rely on herself for anything, after not being able to be independent for so long, she doesn’t know what to do. In order to help herself move on, and to prove her independence to herself, she decides to get her driver’s license and take a road trip. During this road trip, she meets people who wrote to her while she was sick. She meets all kinds of people on her trip - from a a teacher grieving the death of her son to a man on death-row. She takes a little bit of wisdom from each person she meets.

    I think that this book will be hard to read for some people who have lost loved ones to cancer. I read it mostly while I was nursing my baby and the two acts combined often brought me to tears. But I found it to be incredibly moving.

    I read a lot of memoirs, but I feel like in some ways this book changed me on a level that I don’t fully understand yet. It has given me a new appreciation for life, a new fire to go out there and pursue my passions.

    I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This book is not coming out until February 9th 2021, but I already pre-ordered a copy. Pre-orders are so important to help books get visibility, but more importantly, this is a book I want on my bookshelf.


  2. Kimba Tichenor Kimba Tichenor says:

    The title of this memoir is taken from a line from Susan Sontag's book Illness as Metaphor: Everyone who is born holds dual citizenship, in the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick. Although we all prefer to use only the good passport, sooner or later each of us is obliged, at least for a spell, to identify ourselves as citizens of that other place, At the age of 22, most of us do not expect to spend any substantial time in the kingdom of the sick. But for 22-year-old Suleika Jaouad, a diagnosis of myeloid leukemia turns her world upside down. The assumption of youthful invincibility is replaced with a strong awareness of the fragility of life, specifically her life. Part I of the memoir tells the story of her battle with cancer.

    But this is not just a memoir about illness, it is also a story about the post-remission struggle to redefine oneself as a member of the kingdom of the well. In contrast to the popular myth that recovery and remission constitute the end point of the story and a return to life as it was before illness, the author shows that remission from cancer marks the beginning of a new struggle, that is, how after years of fighting to survive do you transition to creating a life. One cannot as she explains return to being the old familiar self. That self is gone: Though the word may suggest otherwise, recovery is not about salvaging the old at all. It's about accepting that you must forsake a familiar self forever, in favor of one that is being newly born. It is an act of brute, terrifying discovery. This journey of discovery in may ways is for the author more painful than the battle with cancer. She must come to terms with the costs of illness and survival -- the changes in her personal relationships, the loss of friends whose battle with cancer did not end with remission, her fears and insecurities, and the uncertainty of the future. She must also find ways to use the knowledge that she has gained from illness.

    The brutal honesty of this telling makes this a powerful read and highlights the courage and tenacity of the author. For unlike so many whitewashed narrative of illness and recovery, the author does not shy away from describing those moments when she does not like the way in which the illness has transformed her: Suffering can make you selfish, turn you cruel. She does not paint an idyllic image of post-remission life. She shares with us her discover that home will always be the in-between place, a wilderness that the author has learned to love.

    I would like to thank NetGalley, the publisher, and the author of this book for an advance copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.


  3. Rather.be.reading1 Rather.be.reading1 says:

    Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I was sucked in from the very first sentence! I love a good travel transformation story so this was great! Definitely recommend.


  4. Becky Becky says:

    Between Two Kingdoms is one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and Suleika Jaouad is an inspirational, courageous young woman. To have gone through the immense physical challenges that she went through would have broken most of us. In fact, Suleika admits that she was many times at the point of death and felt beyond broken, physically and mentally. Her remarkable story of diagnosis, years of treatments, physical recovery, and her time on the road trying to decide who she was afterwards is thought-provoking and engaging.


  5. Linda Metzger Linda Metzger says:

    I really lucked out...receiving THIS book to review from NetGalley!!!!!!!
    A memoir you will never forget! Suleika went through so much trying to get well after finding out she had leukemia and boy did the author have me feeling her pain!!! What an amazing journey she had!!
    Eloquent writing...superb writing!!!
    You are bound to be so touched by Suleika's journey.....It will take me a while to figure our all the reasons I will never forget this story~
    5 STARS...I highly recommend this memoir~


  6. Sara Sara says:

    I was so happy to get an advance reader's copy from NetGalley. I had remembered reading Jaouad's columns in the New York Times and had been moved and impressed by her writing. Her book is even better--from the content to the writing style--it is a book that deserves to be widely read and re-read for all the important thoughts that it holds. Highly recommended.


  7. Kimba Tichenor Kimba Tichenor says:

    The title of this memoir is taken from a line from Susan Sontag's book Illness as Metaphor: Everyone who is born holds dual citizenship, in the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick. Although we all prefer to use only the good passport, sooner or later each of us is obliged, at least for a spell, to identify ourselves as citizens of that other place, At the age of 22, most of us do not expect to spend any substantial time in the kingdom of the sick. But for 22-year-old Suleika Jaouad, a diagnosis of myeloid leukemia turns her world upside down. The assumption of youthful invincibility is replaced with a strong awareness of the fragility of life, specifically her life. Part I of the memoir tells the story of her battle with cancer.

    But this is not just a memoir about illness, it is also a story about the post-remission struggle to redefine oneself as a member of the kingdom of the well. In contrast to the popular myth that recovery and remission constitute the end point of the story and a return to life as it was before illness, the author shows that remission from cancer marks the beginning of a new struggle, that is, how after years of fighting to survive do you transition to creating a life. One cannot as she explains return to being the old familiar self. That self is gone: Though the word may suggest otherwise, recovery is not about salvaging the old at all. It's about accepting that you must forsake a familiar self forever, in favor of one that is being newly born. It is an act of brute, terrifying discovery. This journey of discovery in may ways is for the author more painful than the battle with cancer. She must come to terms with the costs of illness and survival -- the changes in her personal relationships, the loss of friends whose battle with cancer did not end with remission, her fears and insecurities, and the uncertainty of the future. She must also find ways to use the knowledge that she has gained from illness.

    The brutal honesty of this telling makes this a powerful read and highlights the courage and tenacity of the author. For unlike so many whitewashed narrative of illness and recovery, the author does not shy away from describing those moments when she does not like the way in which the illness has transformed her: Suffering can make you selfish, turn you cruel. She does not paint an idyllic image of post-remission life. She shares with us her discover that home will always be the in-between place, a wilderness that the author has learned to love.


  8. Carolann Carolann says:

    This book is sort of divided into three parts. When the book opens, Suleika Jaouad has just graduated from college. She moved to Paris and fell in love. Then, she found out she had leukemia. She moved back home with her parents in New York to begin treatment. Her boyfriend, who she really has only begun dating, leaves Paris and also moves in with her parents to support her.

    This part of the book was incredibly difficult to read at times, because she went through so much. During her treatment, she could not take care of herself at all, and constantly needed someone with her. Her boyfriend and mom ended up taking shifts because she could not be alone. On one heartbreaking occasion, she is alone for the evening and doesn’t even have the energy to get food to take with her mediation. Her boyfriend comes to home to find her on the floor throwing up.

    She had a very small chance to survive and had to watch her parents practically grieve her. Along the way, she makes friends who are also battling cancer and together they form their “cancer crew.” I could not hold back my tears as she describes their friendship, their hard conversations, and the way she had to say goodbye to them one by one.

    At a young age, Jaouad experienced more than most of us will experience in a lifetime. She found herself wanting to write, to get her story out, to have her life and her story mean something. Despite having absolutely no energy, she forms a blog, which quickly turns into a column for the New York Times. People begin to write to Jaouad from all over the world to express their support, to share their stories.

    After she recovers, she has a hard time finding her way “between two kingdoms,” that is, between the kingdom of the sick and the kingdom of the healthy. After not being able to rely on herself for anything, after not being able to be independent for so long, she doesn’t know what to do. In order to help herself move on, and to prove her independence to herself, she decides to get her driver’s license and take a road trip. During this road trip, she meets people who wrote to her while she was sick. She meets all kinds of people on her trip - from a a teacher grieving the death of her son to a man on death-row. She takes a little bit of wisdom from each person she meets.

    I think that this book will be hard to read for some people who have lost loved ones to cancer. I read it mostly while I was nursing my baby and the two acts combined often brought me to tears. But I found it to be incredibly moving.

    I read a lot of memoirs, but I feel like in some ways this book changed me on a level that I don’t fully understand yet. It has given me a new appreciation for life, for my independence, and a new fire to go out there and pursue my passions.

    I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This book is not coming out until February 9th 2021, but I already pre-ordered a copy. Pre-orders are so important to help books get visibility, but more importantly, this is a book I want on my bookshelf.


  9. Jena Henry Jena Henry says:

    Author Suleika Jaouad gifts us with a three-act play in her memoir of her life spent in the kingdom of illness, and then the kingdom of recovery. “Act One” is the story of her life in the kingdom of the well and healthy. We meet a young and talented woman, finishing college at Princeton, ready to seize the world. “Act II” is the overwhelming story of her multi-year travails against leukemia. ‘Act III” starts out as a “is that all there is?” period of her life. How do you go between the kingdoms of critical illness and then the possibility of life?

    Much of what Ms. Jaouad tells us is based on her well-known blog, “Girl, Interrupted.” But she experienced so much more than an interruption. Her life was totally knocked apart, and then she was slowly and carefully able to rebuild it. She survived, but then did not know how to live. Her writing is honest, stark yet lyrical, and she shares it all- family, dating, relationships, the details of her illness and treatment. Her humor mixes with her pain and anguish. (Her brother started calling her “Suleikemia”.)

    In “Act III”, after a year of depression and feeling untethered after her arduous treatments were over, she comes up with the idea to go on a solo road trip across America. She travels from the East Coast to the West Coast (she just learned how to drive!) and she visits some of the people who connected with her during her illness. All of the folks she visits became friends through her blog and all are lovely people. Probably the most unusual was the man she chatted with on death row.

    The book ends as she returns to New York, ready to accept whatever mind and body she currently has. This is a long story, a consuming story, and well worth the read. I received an advance digital review copy from NetGalley and the Publisher Random house (thanks for granting me my wish!). This is my honest review.


  10. Jenna Jenna says:

    Exceptional book!
    The author's beautiful writing explores both the harsh realities of illness as well as what hard questions lie on the other side for a survivor whose body has betrayed them in such a horrific way. I think we often assume that survivors will have a new lease on life and be overwhelmingly positive, however, her memoir demonstrates how the scars and fears after going through something so traumatic persist even after a person is given a clean bill of health.
    As someone in healthcare who has taken care of patients with ailments such as Suleika's leukemia, it particularly touched me and enabled me to better understand the suffering that these patients go through. Her account is unflinching and rightfully so.
    I also appreciated her cross-country journey to meet in person those that had written to her and the revelations she discovered about life and herself.
    This is truly an inspiring book and one I highly recommend!


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